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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of what he had to say regarding the fiscal cliff and the threat that looms. let me play it. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000, if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. >> so is it a bluff when the obama administration says they're willing to go off the cliff if a deal is not reached on rates? >> i don't think it's a bluff. if you look at the reality of what happens, all the leverage which i -- right now clearly the white house has. they get more leverage if we go over their cliff. you can argue that would not send a good message to the country, to the world. it would prove that we are dysfunctional and cannot govern, et cetera, et cetera. in terms of dealing with the policy problem, which is you have this massive and growing debt, you have to bring in more revenues. there's multiple ways to do it, but critical ways to raise rates on the top end. it was what
and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls church sitting down with the santana family. their parents who also are employed live in the household with them. so if taxes do go up on middle class americans, the overall hit on that household will be $4,000. so they're very concerned, but they were quite happy. they said it isn't every day that the president comes by and hangs out at your house. the message the president was trying to drive home today was aimed directly at congress and using this backdrop to tell a personal story. >> for them to be burdene
fiasco. >>> plus, congressman chris van hollen on john boehner's latest concession on the fiscal cliff. michael eric dyson and donna genteel-o'donnell on the political fallout. howard dean on chris christie's big decision on the obama care exchange. and apple's ceo breaks big news to nbc's brian williams. >> next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> tonight, a story of economic patriotism in an era of bain capital with e.j. dionne. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. the reality start to set in on members of the republican party. republican senator jim demint of south carolina is leaving kplil capitol hill to become president of the heritage foundation. don't cry for demint. the out-going president of the heritage foundation made $1.1 million according to 2010 tax filings. demint will do just fine. it's not just about the money. the senator realizes he could be more effective for the conservative movement if he's not attached to the dysfunctional party known as the republican party. in a statement, demint said "i'm leaving th
're fiscal cliff cliff fatigued to death. it's a real turnoff and we know it, but i want to address the issue in big picture terms with you because you're big picture thinker. i think at the end of the day we will have higher taxes on wealthy people, promises to cut spending somewhere down the road and don't worry about the debt, ignore it it. i think that's the outline of a big picture deal. what do you say? >> i sort of agree, stuart. there will be higher taxes. i do think the republicans will extract a couple of entitle reformat. a new way to calculate the cost of living adjustment and social security, maybe a higher payment by beneficiaries who are wealthier in medicare and finally the last point you make is the really intriguing one, that's the debt ceiling. and my hunch is the republicans will cave on taxes and they'll come back to fight again later in the winter on the debt ceiling and they could really extract major spending cuts by late winter. >> so you don't think the president will get the blank check that he wants, no debt ceiling? he wants no debt ceiling, you don't think he'll
the fact that the fed is stepping on the gas, and, depending on what happens with the fiscal cliff and of course the economy next year, i think the dollar is going to drift a little bit weaker. nothing dramatic, but i think it will drift a little weaker as the year progresses. > thanks tim. have a good trading day. > > thanks. just in time for the holidays, hostess brands' layoff of more than 18,000 employees is part of a bulge in end-of-the-year layoffs this year. job cuts are up for the third straight month, and our cover story looks at whether this is a trend that may continue in the new year. job cuts nationwide were up for the third consecutive month in november. november would have been lower, but hostess brands' 18,500 layoffs as a part of bankruptcy pushed the number higher. "it's not a reflection of the strength of the economy as a whole." since january, the number of announced layoffs is actually 13% lower than it was in 2011. that's despite a dreadful january and february that saw more than 50,000 layoffs at american airlines, pepsico, j.c. penney, metlife and procter an
of the rich, particularly on this sort of fiscal cliff fight. you could be forgiven for thinking the only thing on which republicans and democrats are really disagreeing are these taxes on the top 2% when really, there are a lot of other factors that are holding up a deal. but democrats have been very savvy in their portrayal of republicans in the last few months. >> i think they have. they won the political battle. charles, bring it round to the fiscal cliff because it's all interwoven here. it's all about basically where should government be spending money, where should cuts be made, and who ends up paying the lion's share of this. my sense is this will not go over the cliff and the reason it won't is that public opinion is now raging so hard against the republicans in all the polls that you see, they've lost the argument so why go over a cliff and make it worse for yourselves. >> i think you're right about that, because all of the polls i've seen say exactly what you're saying which is that the republicans will be blamed if we go over the cliff. but the first part of your question i th
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)